The battle against all types of cancer continues to be waged worldwide, as scientists and biologists develop and wield increasingly sophisticated and technological weapons in the global fight against cancer. However, leukemia has largely passed under the radar of this war in the past few years.

Leukemia is quite unlike other cancers. Although a host of carcinogens are known to increase the risk of contracting leukemia, it is still a largely genetic disease. No main or known cause for all the different types of leukemia exist.

This website, LeukemiaforAdults, was created with the express goal of educating the public about adult leukemia. Detection methods, common symptoms, treatment methods, and general information about leukemia are presented here. On the next few pages, you will know everything you need to know about one of the world's most virulent yet mystifying cancers.





Blood sample of patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia
Blood sample of patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia
A diagram describing the difference between lymphatic and myelogenous leukemia. Lymphatic leukemia produces abnormal B-cells and T-cells, while myelogenous leukemia produces abnormal phagocytes and erythrocytes (red blood cells)
A diagram describing the difference between lymphatic and myelogenous leukemia. Lymphatic leukemia produces abnormal B-cells and T-cells, while myelogenous leukemia produces abnormal phagocytes and erythrocytes (red blood cells)
Death rates of adult leukemia by country (2004, World Health Organization). Darker colors indicate a higher fatality rate for all types of adult leukemia. Notice the lack of an environmental correlation to death rates - part of which makes leukemia such an unusual disease.
Death rates of adult leukemia by country (2004, World Health Organization). Darker colors indicate a higher fatality rate for all types of adult leukemia. Notice the lack of an environmental correlation to death rates - part of which makes leukemia such an unusual disease.